Natural ways to get tid of gnats in indoor plants


Natural ways to get tid of gnats in indoor plants

Are there any natural ways to get rid of the gnats in my indoor plant? I don't want to use chemical pesticides or anti-gnat sprays for my plant. I know gnats feed on the nectar of plants like ivy and I've heard spraying them with sugar will get rid of them for a while. Would that work for this problem? I'm in southern Florida. I don't know if there are gnats here or not, but if so I can't really spray my plant with anything I shouldn't be using anyway.

My garden gnomes that are about 6" tall with their little "cloaks" are thriving indoors right now. In the past I didn't even know they were gnats! Their "cloaks" are like their wings and they flap them around when they fly. And if you are in the south, they can be real nuisances. My garden gnomes will eventually move outside with the temperatures rising.

I am looking for non-poisonous chemical ways to get rid of them. My indoor plants just seem to attract more gnats with warmer temps.

"The most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious. It is the source of all true art and all science. He to whom this emotion is a stranger, who can no longer pause to wonder and stand rapt in awe, is as good as dead: his eyes are closed." Albert Einstein

It may be beneficial to remove the plant from where the indoor gnats are getting a drink, and to put it somewhere else that may not have the feeding and breeding area in it. I wouldn't say the gnats are not a good idea, but they may not be living there anymore. They like to have a lot of nectar available to them when they are larvae. It is their food source as they grow up. You could buy some nectar and place it close to the plant.

I don't have the solution for you, but they may not be as bad as you think.

"The most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious. It is the source of all true art and all science. He to whom this emotion is a stranger, who can no longer pause to wonder and stand rapt in awe, is as good as dead: his eyes are closed." Albert Einstein

So, I thought I would go to Amazon.com and search for "gnats". The link would take you to all the Amazon.com sellers of all products related to that specific topic. (I found hundreds of products).

"The most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious. It is the source of all true art and all science. He to whom this emotion is a stranger, who can no longer pause to wonder and stand rapt in awe, is as good as dead: his eyes are closed." Albert Einstein

You can't be in them and they can't climb out. The only way is if the window has an edge on it and it would not be recommended. You can use the edge of your hand to push out the glass if you could catch them inside. But, that would not do.

It is always great when you can get a video on what is going on with your hive, I am guessing you could use the video as your starting point for a discussion with your beekeeper. The first thing I would say would be that I would look at the frames themselves to see if there was anything amiss. It is true that the honey they take, is what it is suppose to be, honey, but the way they harvest it is different from the way you harvest honey and you may have more of the comb that is wax than honey. I would recommend that you bring all the frames to your beekeeper, if you have one, and if not, then to a local beekeeping professional who is familiar with your situation and have it looked over.

We do not have a lot of "honey" in this area at all. Even where we have honey, it is not abundant. The bees also have a different way of harvesting the honey. Instead of the beekeeper grabbing the comb with their hands and extracting the honey, they go by and grab it with a comb that is filled with the honey by the bees.

As you are aware, we have never used foundation. Our frames are all just frames. The foundation comes into play when you "stack" frames. We have been stacking frames without foundation for years. You should start with one hive that is in no way used for honey production. The bees don't need to be conditioned to the foundation so then you can start with your foundationless boxes. And then you can move them to the hives that are intended to be used for honey production and you will have success.

One question that you could use this as an opportunity to ask is how to harvest honey? What do you have in your area? What do you have to do to get honey? I do not see a need to be conditioned to the foundation so I do not need any foundation to work on. But then I do not need to purchase any foundation to put the foundationless frames in the hives either.

You can use what you have.

Thanks for your Reply!

Report This| Share this:Beekeeper Answers: Hive Equipment &, Harvesting Beekeeper Answers: Hive Equipment &, HarvestingWe do not have a lot of "honey" in this area at all. Even where we have honey, it is not abundant. The bees also have a different way of harvesting the honey. Instead of the beekeeper grabbing the comb with their hands and extracting the honey, they go by and grab it with a comb that is filled with the honey by the bees.

As you are aware, we have never used foundation in the hives that we have. They were built with frames that were to be used for honey production.

I know that the hives that I plan to put them in do have foundation. They are all foundationless. We just use different top bars and some different boxes. But I see no need to buy any foundation to put the frames in them.

Our plan is to build some honey buckets to use for harvesting the honey. We would like to make this process as easy as possible. Since the hives are different, we will need to make and buy some things.

Also, we want to get our hive equipment and then move them around. We are thinking about doing a few of each. So we will not be able to condition to foundation and then move them to the hives that will be used for honey production. We do not need to be conditioned to the foundation so then you can start with your foundationless boxes. And then you can move them around to whatever hives that you need to have to use foundation.

I know that it can take anywhere from two to four years for your bees to get conditioned to your foundation. But they will be well conditioned and ready to start their honey production. I know of no reason that you have to be conditioned to the foundation. That is the reason that we started with foundationless frames and are now transitioning to foundationless hives.

Another important thing that we want to do is to remove the boxes from the top bars and replace them with new boxes that we make. We are going to replace the top bars and then put the boxes in that we make on those top bars.

We do not have the money to buy any of the boxes that are listed in your guide. They cost about $30.00 per box that you get the bees conditioned. We want to build them ourselves. So that will give us the advantage to try things out and then modify them if we



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