Planting tulips daffodils crocus in an established garden


After my tulips are dormant, can I plant another flower on top of the bulbs? There are gaps in the garden in front of my house that are not so pretty! Mike: Last Spring I heard you say that the reasons we here in the US as opposed to Holland have problems getting our Spring bulbs to flower year after year are that:. Your advice was that once the greenery had died back it was better to dig the bulbs up and place them, layered by type, in a pot, separating the layers with a mix of alternating layers of peat and vermiculite.

Content:
  • How to plant bulbs in lawns
  • Planning and Designing Your Bulb Garden
  • Choosing and growing spring bulbs
  • How to Fertilize Spring-Blooming Bulbs
  • Falling for Bulbs: The time to plant for spring is now!
  • 10 Spring Bulb Questions
  • Potted dwarf bulbs and why we prefer to plant bulbs in the Spring
  • The 5 Best Bulbs to Plant in Spring for Summer Blooms
  • The Top 6 Tips for Planting Bulbs in the Fall
WATCH RELATED VIDEO: Tulips, Crocuses, and Daffodils - A Journey of planting to storing BULBS

How to plant bulbs in lawns

I love all of them well, except for hyacinths and used to plant a large assortment every fall. Above are shots from my former garden, where I planted tulips, yanked them out after the blooms faded and had the fun of trying new ones in the same spot the next year. But no more. Hooray for daffodils! It looked ridiculous. So over the years I gradually rearranged them into clumps, masses and sweeps — which we all know look better than one-offs.

This old photo shows the right way to do it. Nowadays I dig smaller holes and plant the bulbs closer together — too close, far closer than the recommended 2-bulb-width apart. Yet, they bloom. Planting bulbs 3 times the depth of their height is fine for tiny bulbs but when it comes to large daffodils, forget about it. Too much work! And yet, those shallow-planted daffodils bloom. Those Ice Follies I planted decades ago continued to bloom like crazy year after year, despite having their leaves tied up.

Helpful advice for some situations is to keep records of what bulbs have been planted and where, which I did recently in the really badly drawing above.

As long as I can read it, right? Most of the bulbs in this garden were sent to me by John Scheepers for review. And I more or less follow the recommendations about planting in late fall, at least by the end of December here in Zone 7. I know some rule-breakers brag about planting bulbs as late as February to no ill effect, but that much rule-breaking is too much for even me.

Co-founder of GardenRant, she also wrote for national gardening magazines and independent garden centers before retiring inNow she has time for these projects:. Founding the pro-science educational nonprofit Good Gardening Videos that finds and promotes the best videos on YouTube for teaching people to garden. Susan rants about anything that misinforms or discourages gardeners — from old-school quacks to mistaken do-gooders to local laws that mandate conformity.

Contact Susan via email or by leaving a comment on one of her articles. And no to flowers the rabbits decimate. I plant bulbs in pots every year successfully, and love having that option. I like that concept, and as I dig holes every fall I imagine every bulb I plant doing the same. When they eventually peter out, then I get new ones.

At the end of March, early April I broadcast a balanced granular fertilizer over all my beds. I think it really depends on whether you care if they return well. I change out hybrid tulips yearly, so plant them in big holes in a bunch, all touching each other. I plant species tulips with more attention to spacing as these do perennialize. In colder zones, you do need to worry about depth more, I think. I would hate to limit myself to daffs though.

Too much yellow! A large bulb distributor on an episode of P. Allen Smith mentioned that daffodils could self plant itself to the correct depth. The bulbs like to be in well-drained soil.

When we dig holes to plant the bulbs in that, bulbs are wet in the summertime when they want to be dry. It actually makes planting a lot easier, and everything grows well with compost.

Interesting research at Cornell University that is similar to the advise that Linus refers to. In this case, the concern is not so much drainage as saving labor. Which flower bulbs will perennialize and come back year after year? The response of bulbs like any plant will vary greatly from region to region, and even season to season, and is also influenced by how you plant them and care for them.

Generally speaking, daffodils Narcissus will be longer-lived than, say, tulips…but even some Narcissus will falter in the wrong climate, certain ones preferring the cooler or warmer ends of their hardiness range. Lilies, Spanish bluebells Hyacinthoides hispanica , Scilla, Camassia, snowdrops and snowflakes Galanthus, Leucojum , glory of the snow Chionodoxa , winter aconite Eranthis and trout lily Erythronium are others that are more inclined to stick around.

Crocus would, but are usually gobbled up here by chipmunks or squirrels. If you want tulips that last, invest in the botanical, or species types which are usually much smaller than the big Dutch hybrids, with a beauty of a more refined nature. It also puts them just a little bit more out of reach of the moles and voles that go around at the top of the soil that would get them.

I like to divide my daffodil bulbs in February when they first emerge Zone 7. That way I know exactly where existing bulbs are. Much easier than harvesting in late spring and storing until fall, then guessing where to put them. So far, this works for me. Planting bulbs too shallow Planting bulbs 3 times the depth of their height is fine for tiny bulbs but when it comes to large daffodils, forget about it. Feeding bulbs Never done it. Yet they bloom. Deadheading bulbs Ditto.

Rules I follow, more or less Helpful advice for some situations is to keep records of what bulbs have been planted and where, which I did recently in the really badly drawing above.

About the Author: Susan Harris. Now she has time for these projects: Founding the pro-science educational nonprofit Good Gardening Videos that finds and promotes the best videos on YouTube for teaching people to garden. Related Posts. December 13, 9 Comments. Making a List and Checking it Twice. December 8, 18 Comments. December 3, 4 Comments.

November 27, at am. Hil November 24, at pm. Chris in PEC November 25, at am. Susan November 25, at am. Linus November 27, at am. Everybody probably asks you this, but how deep do I plant relative to the size of the bulb? Chris N November 28, at am. Linus November 28, at pm. But some of the big hybrids can be pushed a little, yes? HonaLee November 28, at pm. NYC Gardener December 4, at pm.

These are enough reasons to keep them and seeds in the big box stores till after the holidays. Go to Top.


Planning and Designing Your Bulb Garden

Bulbs and bulb-like structures provide energy for plants to grow, bloom and complete their life cycles each year. Bulbs may be hardy spring- and early summer-flowering or tender summer-flowering. Hardy bulbs or spring flowering bulbs require a cold period to break their dormancy and begin spring flower development. Hardy bulbs are quite easy to work with, require minimal care once properly planted, and come up every spring with a wonderful show of color.

FOR FALL BULB PLANTING: (Tulips, Daffodils, Narcissus, Hyacinth, Crocus, Anemone, Etc.) Place 15 ml (1 tablespoon) per bulb in the planting hole cover with 1 to.

Choosing and growing spring bulbs

Plant pots and containers can brighten up even the smallest gardens - they add colour to your outdoor space and can enhance patios and windowsills. What you plant in your pots and containers really is a matter of personal preference. Some gardeners opt for one or two blooms, while others layer bulbs in pots to enjoy a range of different colours blooming at different times throughout the spring. Plants like crocus, tulips, daffodils, hyacinths, iris and snowdrop are all very popular and will thrive in your containers with the right care. Don't be afraid to try some more adventurous varieties; West Point tulips, Dancing Flames or Champagne Flutes add vibrant personality to a garden, while bulbs like bluebells help create a garden oasis. In general, the best time to plant your bulbs is in the autumn, though this may vary from bulb to bulb depending on its bloom date. Always check the back of the pack for details. The depth and spacing of planted bulbs differ depending on the size of the bulb and whether it is a border bulb or a container bulb. In general, bulbs should be planted times their diameter deep and times their diameter apart. The below table provides a handy guide but when in doubt always consult the back of the pack for details.

How to Fertilize Spring-Blooming Bulbs

I love all of them well, except for hyacinths and used to plant a large assortment every fall. Above are shots from my former garden, where I planted tulips, yanked them out after the blooms faded and had the fun of trying new ones in the same spot the next year. But no more. Hooray for daffodils!

When autumn's chill brings bulb-planting time and visions of a glorious springtime, it can be tempting to pack daffodil or tulip bulbs into every square inch of the garden.

Falling for Bulbs: The time to plant for spring is now!

Gardeners have been growing bulbs in pots and other containers for thousands of years. Compared to the garden itself, even the largest containers are tiny, cramped, highly artificial worlds where the wrong potting soil, extreme temperatures, or a couple of days without water can mean the difference between success and disappointment. On the other hand, after reviewing this page for us, our good customer and bulb-lover Elizabeth Licata of GardenRant. I am very lazy and try to get through my gardening with as little trouble to myself as possible. Fall-planted bulbs in containers have different needs than bulbs planted directly in the ground.

10 Spring Bulb Questions

Daffodil bulbs are best planted in September - November in well drained soil. They will grow well in sun or part shade. Plant them anywhere in the garden in a free draining situation, avoiding total shade and close proximity to south facing walls where the soil temperature is likely to become uncomfortably hot for the bulbs. Plant at twice the depth of the bulb i. For miniature daffodils, plant at twice the depth of the bulb and ins apart.

This gives the planted bulbs time to put down roots, before the ground freezes. When snowdrops, daffodils, crocuses, hyacinths, tulips.

Potted dwarf bulbs and why we prefer to plant bulbs in the Spring

By on. Almost every gardener grows spring bulbs like tulips, daffodils, hyacinths and crocus. Millions of new bulbs are sold every year and yet people do not agree on the best time to plant them. Some want to plant early, as soon as they arrive in shops.

The 5 Best Bulbs to Plant in Spring for Summer Blooms

Bulb companies know we need a burst of blooming spring beauty after enduring the cold, dark days of winter. Fall is the ideal time to plant spring bulbs. We all eagerly anticipate the beautiful blooms of bulbs and love showing off our spring flowers on Instagram. However, the ugly reality quickly follows: senescing foliage, the necessary evil of growing bulbs. Hence, perennials to the rescue—the perfect combination with spring bulbs!

Spring bulbs such as daffodils, crocus, grape hyacinth, and tulips are in full bloom from March through May depending on where you live. The most critical care time for bulbs is right after they finish flowering, so enjoy the display, and get your ducks in a row to give these plants a leg up on the next season.

The Top 6 Tips for Planting Bulbs in the Fall

Bulbs are little packets of flower power that make us wait weeks, sometimes months, for results — but boy, are they worth it. With a little basic knowledge, anyone can grow beautiful bulbs. Spring bulbs: Also called hardy bulbs, these bulbs are planted in fall, spend winter in the ground, and flower in spring. Some of the more common spring bulbs are tulips , irises , daffodils , hyacinth , allium and crocus. These bulbs need several weeks of cold temperatures to break their dormancy and flower to their full potential. Summer bulbs: Also called tender bulbs, these bulbs are planted in spring and flower or leaf out in summer.

As fall washes the Intermountain West in an array of orange and golden-brown hues, it can be challenging to imagine vibrant flowers making their appearance next spring. Though the brisk air and promise of coming winter may not scream "planting time" to most people, the cooler temperatures and soil are prime for promoting early color in your flower beds next spring. Tulips, Daffodils and other spring-flowering bulbs are best suited for cultivation in the fall's cooler temperatures. Find out how to "chill" bulbs in mild winter climates.



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